Facing the World, Facing the Future: How Japan is Working to Represent Itself as a Nation at Sport Mega-Events

Wolfram Manzenreiter, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Vienna Introduction The 2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan was the first to be staged on the world’s most populous continent, Asia, and it was the first to be co-hosted by two nations. Watched by 2.7 million spectators, who followed the performance of 32 national teams in Japan and Korea’s twenty brand-new […]

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A Tohoku Utopia? Alternative Paths After March 11, 2011

Yuko Nishimura Five months and 15 days after the March 11 (3.11) Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and the Fukushima nuclear disaster, Prime Minister Naoto Kan fulfilled his promise to resign from office; in a 15 minute speech, he listed his achievements and praised himself saying “I did what I had to do.”  Kan was the fifth prime minister to step down […]

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Expatriate and ‘Local Hire’ Japanese in Hong Kong and the Struggle for the Soul of Japan

Ayako Sone and Gordon Mathews This article is based on research conducted by Ayako Sone in 2001-2002 on the cultural identities of Japanese in Hong Kong; but it places that research into a broader perspective.  We discuss the conflict between “Japanese” and “non-Japanese” among Japanese in Hong Kong: the conflict between expatriates and local hires—between, we argue, those who represent […]

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Tying People into Circles: Japan’s Future in Light of its Communicative Strategies

Peter Ackermann Japan’s possible futures, I suggest in this paper, may to a large extent be directed by the everyday models and strategies that Japanese people use to interact with one another, and with the wider world in the years to come. Communication strategies, and the culturally specific models of “the universe” and “the person” (inside the universe) on which […]

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Lost Melbourne: A Digital Ethnography of a Facebook Local History Group

Stefan Schutt, Marsha Berry and Lisa Cianci Victoria University, RMIT University Abstract Places and historical artefacts are being reimagined through social media on a daily and routine basis. Using an approach drawn from digital ethnography we analyse a 24-hour snapshot of the ‘Lost Melbourne’ Facebook community from an insider’s perspective. Lost Melbourne generates new perspectives on local history on a […]

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